Commands by suyashjain (3)

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Quick command line math
expr will give you a quick way to do basic math from the CLI. Make sure you escape things like * and leave a space between operators and digits.

Weather on the Command line
Get your weather from a weather station just blocks from your home. Go to http://www.wunderground.com/wundermap/ and find a weather station near you. Click on a temperature bubble for that area. When the window pops up, click on hypertext link with the station ID, then on the bottom right of the page, click on the Current Conditions XML. Thats your link! Good luck!

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

When feeling down, this command helps
$ sudo apt-get install sl $ man sl

Create commands to download all of your Google docs
Create commands to download all of your Google docs to the current directory.

Process command output line by line in a while loop
This snippet allows to process the output of any bash command line by line.

Backup with versioning
Apart from an exact copy of your recent contents, also keep all earlier versions of files and folders that were modified or deleted. Inspired by the excellent EVACopy http://evacopy.sourceforge.net

quick and dirty formatting for HTML code
Finds all the closing tags in a HTML document via non-greedy regex and adds a linefeed for easier reading/editing . sed -i.bak -r 's_(/[^>]*?>)_\1\n_g' filename.html . This will save a copy of filename.html as filename.html.bak and then add the linefeeds to the original file

Tunnel ssh through Socks Proxy
If you are blocked or need to use a Socks proxy

list files in mtime order
Simple but useful; list files in the current directory in mtime order. Useful if you've been working on something and then take a day or two off.


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