Commands by suyashjain (3)

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Show all detected mountable Drives/Partitions/BlockDevices
Yields entries in the form of "/dev/hda1" etc. Use this if you are on a new system and don't know how the storage hardware (ide, sata, scsi, usb - with ever changing descriptors) is connected and which partitions are available. Far better than using "fdisk -l" on guessed device descriptors.

detach remote console for long running operations
Starts midnightcommander and allows you to detach the console; use ctrl-\ to detach Then at a later time you can reconnect using $ dtach -a /tmp/wires-mc In my experience dtach works much better for programs like irssi, mutt, mc, aptitude than screen does.

Pimp your less
# s = combine multiple lines of whitespace into 1 # x4 = set the tabstop to 4 instead of 8 # F = Exit if the output fits on 1 screen. This is similar to git diff # R = Raw control chars. This allows you to pipe colordiff straight to less. ie: alias sdi="svn diff | colordiff | less" # S = Chop off long lines # X = Dont send termcap init and deinit scrings to the terminal

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

A fun thing to do with ram is actually open it up and take a peek. This command will show you all the string (plain text) values in ram

Run a command that has been aliased without the alias
Most distributions alias cp to 'cp -i', which means when you attempt to copy into a directory that already contains the file, cp will prompt to overwrite. A great default to have, but when you mean to overwrite thousands of files, you don't want to sit there hitting [y] then [enter] thousands of times. Enter the backslash. It runs the command unaliased, so as in the example, cp will happily overwrite existing files much in the way mv works.

Delete .svn directories and content recursively
Use carefully have rm -rf ;-)

show the real times iso of epochs for a given column
When you have one of those (log)files that only has epoch for time (since no one will ever look at them as a date) this is a way to get the human readable date/time and do further inspection. Mostly perl-fu :-/

Watch several log files in a single window
It works like a "tail -f" on several files. Use the number keys 0-9 to set a baseline in the numbered window. Pressing "b" let you scroll back in one of the windows.

Check if a package is installed. If it is, the version number will be shown.
If the first two letters are "ii", then the package is installed. You can also use wildcards. For example, . $ dpkg -l openoffice* . Note that dpkg will usually not report packages which are available but uninstalled. If you want to see both which versions are installed and which versions are available, use this command instead: . $ apt-cache policy python


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