Commands by symgryph (7)

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Generate random valid mac addresses
Ruby version. Also, a perl version: $perl -e 'printf("%.2x.",rand(255))for(1..5);printf("%.2x\n",rand(255))'

Download all Phrack .tar.gzs

Run a command, redirecting output to a file, then edit the file with vim.
This is one of those 'nothing' shell functions ...which I use all the time. If the command contains spaces, it must be quoted, e.g. $ vimcmd 'svn diff' /tmp/svndiff.out If I want to keep the output of the command that I'm running, I use vimcmd. If I don't need to keep the output, I use this: $ vim

Find the package that installed a command

Add the time to BASH prompt
Adds the time in 12hr AM/PM format to the beginning of a prompt. Change \@ to \t for 24-hour time or \T for 12hr without AM/PM. To keep the time the next time you open a terminal, edit ~/.bashrc and stick the command at the bottom.

convert from hexidecimal or octal to decimal
Bash can accept '0x' and '0' notation for hexidecimal and octal numbers, so you just have to output the values.

Display 16 largest installed RPMs in size order, largest first
Interesting to see which packages are larger than the kernel package. Useful to understand which RPMs might be candidates to remove if drive space is restricted.

find only current directory (universal)
you must be in the directory to analyse report all files and links in the currect directory, not recursively. this find command ahs been tested on hp-ux/linux/aix/solaris.

Convert ascii string to hex
Converts the ascii text to hex from bash. Check the sample output.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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