Commands by taintedkernel (5)

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Wait for file to stop changing
This loop will finish if a file hasn't changed in the last 10 seconds. . It checks the file's modification timestamp against the clock. If 10 seconds have elapsed without any change to the file, then the loop ends. . This script will give a false positive if there's a 10 second delay between updates, e.g. due to network congestion . How does it work? 'date +%s' gives the current time in seconds 'stat -c %Y' gives the file's last modification time in seconds '$(( ))' is bash's way of doing maths '[ X -lt 10 ]' tests the result is Less Than 10 otherwise sleep for 1 second and repeat . Note: Clever as this script is, inotify is smarter.

parse html/stdin with lynx
strips html from stdin

See a full last history by expanding logrotated wtmp files
When your wtmp files are being logrotated, here's an easy way to unpack them all on the fly to see more than a week in the past. The rm is the primitive way to prevent symlink prediction attack.

Shows what processes need to be restarted after system upgrade
emerge,apt-get,yum... all update your system. This will at some point replace either a runtime dependency or a process (which is still running). This oneliner will list what processes need to be restarted

Joins args together using the first arg as glue

rsync...

Mount windows share to the specified location including credentials
Replace IP address with yours IP.

Text graphing ping output filter
Nasty perl one-liner that provides a sparkline of ping times. If you want a different history than the last 30, just put that value in. It (ab)uses unicode to draw the bars, inspired by https://github.com/joemiller/spark-ping . It's not the most bug-free piece of code, but what it lacks in robustness it makes up for in capability. :) If anyone has any ideas on how to make it more compact or better, I'd love to hear them. I included a ping to google in the command just as an example (and burned up 10 chars doing it!). You should use it with: $ ping example.com | $SPARKLINE_PING_COMMAND

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

vimdiff to remotehost
vimdiff to remotehost


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