Commands by taylorwatson (0)

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detect partitions
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Create incremental snapshots of individual folders using find and tar-gzip
Creates an incremental snapshot of individual folders.

Create a single-use TCP (or UDP) proxy
Redirect the local port 2000 to the remote port 3000. The same but UDP: $ nc -u -l -p 2000 -c "nc -u example.org 3000" It may be used to "convert" TCP client to UDP server (or viceversa): $ nc -l -p 2000 -c "nc -u example.org 3000"

list files recursively by size

File rotation without rename command
Rotates log files with "gz"-extension in a directory for 7 days and enumerates the number in file name. i.e.: logfile.1.gz > logfile.2.gz I needed this line due to the limitations on AIX Unix systems which do not ship with the rename command.

Stop Flash from tracking everything you do.
Brute force way to block all LSO cookies on a Linux system with the non-free Flash browser plugin. Works just fine for my needs. Enjoy.

Alternative way to generate an XKCD #936 style 4 word password usig sed
This is what I came up to generate XKCD #936 style four-word password. Since first letter of every word is capitalized it looks a bit more readable to my eyes. Also strips single quotes. And yes - regex is a bit of a kludge, but that's the bes i could think of.

Get the size of all the directories in current directory
OSX's BSD version of the du command uses the -d argument instead of --max-depth.

Show the 20 most CPU/Memory hungry processes
This command will show the 20 processes using the most CPU time (hungriest at the bottom). You can see the 20 most memory intensive processes (hungriest at the bottom) by running: $ ps aux | sort +3n | tail -20 Or, run both: $ echo "CPU:" && ps aux | sort +2n | tail -20 && echo "Memory:" && ps aux | sort +3n | tail -20

start vim in diff mode
vim will open both files side by side and show colored diffs


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