Commands by tbaschak (1)

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Automagically update grub.conf labels after installing a new kernel
I like to label my grub boot options with the correct kernel version/build. After building and installing a new kernel with "make install" I had to edit my grub.conf by hand. To avoid this, I've decided to write this little command line to: 1. read the version/build part of the filename to which the kernel symlinks point 2. replace the first label lines of grub.conf grub.conf label lines must be in this format: Latest [{name}-{version/build}] Old [{name}-{version/build}] only the {version/build} part is substituted. For instance: title Latest [GNU/Linux-2.6.31-gentoo-r10.201003] would turn to title Latest [GNU/Linux-2.6.32-gentoo-r7.201004]"

Analyze awk fields
Breaks down and numbers each line and it's fields. This is really useful when you are going to parse something with awk but aren't sure exactly where to start.

Search for packages, ranked by popularity
This will take the packages matching a given `apt-cache search` query (a collection of AND'd words or regexps) and tell you how popular they are. This is particularly nice for those times you have to figure out which solution to use for e.g. a PDF reader or a VNC client. Substitute "ubuntu.com" for "debian.org" if you want this to use Ubuntu's data instead. Everything else will work perfectly.

delete duplicate lines from a file and keep the order of the other lines
i wanted to delete all duplicate lines from .bash_history and keep the order of the other lines. the command cat's the file and adds line numbers, then sorts by the second column. afterwards uniq omits repeated lines, but skips the first field (the line number). then it sorts by the line numbers and at the end cuts the numbers off.

Ask for a password, the passwd-style
You can ask repeatedly for a non-blank password using this function: function read_password() { while [ ! -n "$USER_PASSWORD" ]; do read -s -p"Password: " USER_PASSWORD if [ ! -n "$USER_PASSWORD" ]; then echo "ERROR: You must specify a valid password, please try again" fi echo done } Also you can set a time out (in seconds) to write the password read -t 10 -s -p"Password: " USER_PASSWORD_VARIABLE if [ ! $? -eq 0 ]; then echo "Time out!" fi

Command to keep an SSH connection open
This runs the uptime command every 30 seconds to avoid an SSH connection dropping due to inactivity. Granted there are better ways of solving this problem but this is sometimes the right tool for the job.

HTTP redirect
any HTTP requests to the machine on the specified port will be redirected to http://www.whatevs.com... quick, dirty, works fine for sites w/

save date and time for each command in history
for the change stay in your history file , export command by writing it into your .bashrc

Download all images from a website in a single folder

Sprunge.us - CLI alternative to PasteBin.com
NAME sprunge: command line pastebin: SYNOPSIS | curl -F 'sprunge=


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