Commands by tewakdeui (0)

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Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

View details of network activity, malicious or otherwise within a port range.
View details of both TCP and UDP network activity within a specified port range.

Bitcoin Brainwallet Base58 Encoder
A bitcoin "brainwallet" is a secret passphrase you carry in your brain. The Bitcoin Brainwallet Private Key Base58 Encoder is the third of three functions needed to calculate a bitcoin PRIVATE key from your "brainwallet" passphrase. This base58 encoder uses the obase parameter of the amazing bc utility to convert from ASCII-hex to base58. Tech note: bc inserts line continuation backslashes, but the "read s" command automatically strips them out. I hope that one day base58 will, like base64, be added to the amazing openssl utility.

Show directories in the PATH, one per line
Shorter version.

Maximum PNG compression with optipng, advpng, and advdef
optipng and advancecomp (for the the advpng and advdef tools) are the best FOSS tools for losslessly compressing PNGs. With the above tool chain, you can cut off as much as 20% off a PNG's file size.

Show whats going on restoring files from a spectrum protect backup
spectrum protect's dsmc command shows file names and total amount of restore. This command shows which files are actually open and their siz in GB and highlights the change to the previous output

Search for a string inside all files in the current directory
Searches all files,dirs (also hidden) recursively

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Crash bash, in case you ever want to for whatever reason
This is a very hackish way to do it that I'm mainly just posting for fun, and I guess technically can more accurately be said to result in undefined behavior. What the command does is tell the shell to treat libpng like it's a shell plugin (which it's most certainly not) and attempt to install a "png_create_read" command from the library. It looks for the struct with the information about the command; since it's always the command name followed by "_struct", it'll look for a symbol called "png_create_read_struct". And it finds it, since this is the name of one of libpng's functions. But bash has no way to tell it's a function instead of a struct, so it goes ahead and parses the function's code as if it was command metadata. Inevitably, bash will attempt to dereference an invalid pointer or whatever, resulting in a segfault.

Network Proxy to dump the application level forward traffic in plain text in the console and in a file.
If you have a client that connects to a server via plain text protocol such as HTTP or FTP, with this command you can monitor the messages that the client sends to the server. Application level text stream will be dumped on the command line as well as saved in a file called proxy.txt. You have to change 8080 to the local port where you want your client to connect to. Change also 192.168.0.1 to the IP address of the destination server and 80 to the port of the destination server. Then simply point your client to localhost 8080 (or whatever you changed it to). The traffic will be redirected to host 192.168.0.1 on port 80 (or whatever you changed them to). Any requests from the client to the server will be dumped on the console as well as in the file "proxy.txt". Unfortunately the responses from the server will not be dumped.


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