Commands by thebodzio (4)

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Copy a file using dd and watch its progress
This is a more accurate way to watch the progress of a dd process. The $DDPID=$! is needed so that you don't get the PID of the sleep. The sleep 1 is needed because in my testing at least, if you run kill -USR1 against dd too quickly, it will kill it off instead of display the status. So you need to wait a second, probably so that it can configure itself to trap the USR1 signal.

add all files not under version control to repository
With the force options the same results can be achieved

Create a .png from a command output and upload to ompdlr.org, give URI
Create a .png from output command or whatever, the upload and give URI from ompdlr.org

Convert deb to rpm
converts between Red Hat rpm, Debian deb, Stampede slp, Slackware tgz, and Solaris pkg file formats ... It also supports LSB packages.

create an emergency swapfile when the existing swap space is getting tight
Create a temporary file that acts as swap space. In this example it's a 1GB file at the root of the file system. This additional capacity is added to the existing swap space.

Perform a C-style loop in Bash.
Print 0 through 99, each on a separate line.

Turn On/Off Keyboard LEDs via commandline
Usefull as a light blink to remember events, mails, intrusions, etc... yet another output Since nobody ever uses the scroll lock function... Usefull to interface a linux system with some hardware, for example, opto interfacing the keyboard led to a relay to remotely reset, etc. ( a simple LDR glued over the LED will do the trick ) xset led 3 turns on the third led, ie, Scroll lock xset -led 3 turns it off xset led 1 turns on Numerical Lock led ( doesn t work on all computer ) xset led 2 turns on Caps Lock led ( idem ) Using it as a reset watchdog, the relay expected light pulses. Shall the computer hangs, the relay releases and reset the machine ( discharge of a capacitor ) ;-)

Print info about your real user.
To get your effective user: whoami

Alert visually until any key is pressed
I learned a few things reading this command. But I did run into a few issues: 1. On systems that don't use GNU echo (e.g. macOS 10.14.5 Mojave), the e option may not be supported. In this case ANSI escape codes will echoed as text and the terminal will not flash, like this: \e[?5h\e[38;5;1m A L E R T Thu Jun 20 16:31:29 PDT 2019 2. Since the read command strips\ignores leading backslashes, if a user types the backslash character once in the loop, it will not break. Typing backslash twice in a loop will break as expected. 3. The foreground color is set to red (\e[38;5;1m) on every loop. This could be set once before we call while, and then reset once when the loop breaks. 4. Instead of resetting the foreground color when it breaks, the video mode is set back to normal (\e[?5l). This has the effect of leaving the terminal text red until it is manually reset. The alternative I'm proposing here addresses these issues. I tested it on macOS and Arch Linux.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials


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