Commands by thebodzio (4)

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tcpdump whole packets to file in ascii and hex with ip adresses instead of hostname

Google text-to-speech in mp3 format
same but redirecting to player and putting whaever text line.. works on my ubuntu machine ...

Count Files in a Directory with Wildcards.
Remove the '-maxdepth 1' option if you want to count in directories as well

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

monitor what processes are waiting for IO interrupts

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Print text string vertically, one character per line.

Connect to TCP port 5000, transfer data and close connexion.
With no '-q 0' switch, nc simply waits, and whatever awaits the data hangs.

Unzip multi-part zip archive
Assuming you have a multi-part archive like "archive.zip archive.z01 archive.z02 ...", unzip will not handle these correctly. If you "fix" the parts into one big file with zip -F before, it works.

Remove duplicate rows of an un-sorted file based on a single column
The command (above) will remove any duplicate rows based on the FIRST column of data in an un-sorted file. The '$1' represents a positional parameter. You can change both instances of '$1' in the command to remove duplicates based on a different column, for instance, the third: $ awk '{ if ($3 in stored_lines) x=1; else print; stored_lines[$3]=1 }' infile.txt > outfile.txt Or you can change it to '$0' to base the removal on the whole row: $ awk '{ if ($0 in stored_lines) x=1; else print; stored_lines[$0]=1 }' infile.txt > outfile.txt ** Note: I wouldn't use this on a MASSIVE file, unless you're RAM-rich ;) **


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