Commands by thenate (0)

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check open ports without netstat or lsof

Kill all processes belonging to a user
This is a 'killall' command equivalent where it is not available. Prior to executing it, set the environment variable USERNAME to the username, whose processes you want to kill or replace the username with the $USERNAME on the command above. Side effect: If any processes from other users, are running with a parameter of $USERNAME, they will be killed as well (assuming you are running this as root user) [-9] in square brackets at the end of the command is optional and strongly suggested to be your last resort. I do not like to use it as the killed process leaves a lot of mess behind.

c_rehash replacement
When you don't have c_rehash handy. Really simple - if you have a .pem file that doesn't really contain a x509 cert (let's say, newreq.pem), it will create a link, simply called '.0', pointing to that file.

Remove a line from a file using sed (useful for updating known SSH server keys when they change)
For example, to remove line 5 from foo, type: vi +5d +wq foo

rsync with progress bar.
transfer files from localhost to a remotehost.

Release memory used by the Linux kernel on caches
The Linux kernel uses unused memory in caches. When you execute "free" you never get the "real" available memory.

Print a random 8 digit number
Don't need to pipe the output into rs if you just tell jot to use a null separator character.

convert unixtime to human-readable with awk
- convert unixtime to human-readable with awk - useful to read logfiles with unix-timestamps, f.e. squid-log: sudo tail -f /var/log/squid3/access.log | awk '{ print strftime("%c ", $1) $0; }

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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