Commands by thoth (3)

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watch iptables counters
Watch the number of packets/bytes coming through the firewall. Useful in setting up new iptables rules or chains. Use this output to reorder rules for efficiency.

Check if *hardware* is 32bit or 64bit
This command tell you if your hardware is 32 or 64 bits even if you install a 32bits OS on a 64 bits hardware. If your distro don't support the -q switch, try doing : $ grep &>/dev/null '\' /proc/cpuinfo && echo 64 bits || echo 32 bits

Show memory stats on Nexenta/Solaris

Go to the Nth line of file

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Select and Edit a File in the Current Directory
This command displays a simple menu of file names in the current directory. After the user made a choice, the command invokes the default editor to edit that file. * Without the break statement, the select command will loop forever * Setting the PS3 prompt is optional * If the user types an invalid choice (such as the letter q), then the variable $f will become an empty string. * For more information, look up the bash's select command

Add a line to a file using sudo
This is the solution to the common mistake made by sudo newbies, since $ sudo echo "foo bar" >> /path/to/some/file does NOT add to the file as root. Alternatively, $ sudo echo "foo bar" > /path/to/some/file should be replaced by $ echo "foo bar" | sudo tee /path/to/some/file And you can add a >/dev/null in the end if you're not interested in the tee stdout : $ echo "foo bar" | sudo tee -a /path/to/some/file >/dev/null

Capitalize first letter of each word in a string
Capitalize first letter of each word in a string.

fast access to any of your favorite directory.
example: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- user@ubuntu:~/workspace/SVN/haystak-repos/trunk/internal/src$ addpi -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Now that directory is in the list of fast access directories. You can switch to it anytime like this: -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- user@ubuntu:~$ pi internal` user@ubuntu:~/workspace/SVN/haystak-repos/trunk/internal/src$ -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Please note the backquote ( the symbol that shares its key with ~ in the keyboard ) pi will switch you to that directory. To see the list of all fast access directories you have to say "cat ~/.pi"

An easter egg built into python to give you the Zen of Python


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