Commands by titus (1)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

take a look to command before action
add |sh when you agree the list, I often use that method to prevent typos in dangerous or long operations

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Print a list of all hardlinks in the working directory, recursively
libpurple likes to hardlink files repeatedly. To ignore libpurple, use sed: | sed '/\.\/\.purple/d'

Use Perl like grep
If you've ever tried "grep -P" you know how terrible it is. Even the man page describes it as "highly experimental". This function will let you 'grep' pipes and files using Perl syntax for regular expressions. The first argument is the pattern, e.g. '/foo/'. The second argument is a filename (optional).

Fast portscanner via Parallel

Create a new file

Git Tree Command with color and tag/branch name

Mount a truecrypt drive from a file from the command line interactively
It seems to completely void the benefit of having an encrypted folder if you then have a script on your unencrypted hard drive with your password in it. This command will mount a truecrypt file at a given mount point after asking you for the password.

[vim] Clear trailing whitespace in file
% acts on every line in the file. \s matches spaces. \+ matches one or more occurrences of what's right behind it. Character '$' matches end-of-line.


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