Commands by tkunz (4)

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loop over a set of items that contain spaces
If you want to operate on a set of items in Bash, and at least one of them contains spaces, the `for` loop isn't going to work the way you might expect. For example, if the current dir has two files, named "file" and "file 2", this would loop 3 times (once each for "file", "file", and "2"): $ for ITEM in `ls`; do echo "$ITEM"; done Instead, use a while loop with `read`: $ ls | while read ITEM; do echo "$ITEM"; done

Perform a reverse DNS lookup
Performs a reverse DNS lookup, variants include: $ nslookup 74.125.45.100 or: $ host 74.125.45.100

display a smiling smiley if the command succeeded and a sad smiley if the command failed
you could save the code between if and fi to a shell script named smiley.sh with the first argument as and then do a smiley.sh to see if the command succeeded. a bit needless but who cares ;)

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

grep for minus (-) sign
Use flag "--" to stop switch parsing

list with full path

Check how far along (in %) your program is in a file
Imagine you've started a long-running process that involves piping data, but you forgot to add the progress-bar option to a command. e.g. $ xz -dc bigdata.xz | complicated-processing-program > summary . This command uses lsof to see how much data xz has read from the file. $ lsof -o0 -o -Fo FILENAME Display offsets (-o), in decimal (-o0), in parseable form (-Fo) This will output something like: . p12607 f3 o0t45187072 . Process id (p), File Descriptor (f), Offset (o) . We stat the file to get its size $ stat -c %s FILENAME . Then we plug the values into awk. Split the line at the letter t: -Ft Define a variable for the file's size: -s=$(stat...) Only work on the offset line: /^o/ . Note this command was tested using the Linux version of lsof. Because it uses lsof's batch option (-F) it may be portable. . Thanks to @unhammer for the brilliant idea.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

List only directories, one per line
Alternatively, $ ls -F | grep /\$ but will break on directories containing newlines. Or the safe, POSIX sh way (but will miss dotfiles): $ for i in *; do test -d "./$i" && printf "%s\n" "$i"; done

list files recursively by size


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