Commands by tobiasboon (5)

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Remove all zero size files from current directory (not recursive)

Alias for getting OpenPGP keys for Launchpad PPAs on Ubuntu
Makes it easy to add keys to new ppa sources entries in apt sources.list Now to add the key for the chromium-daily ppa: $ launchpadkey 4E5E17B5

Report all quota usage
Check disk quota for all user

Convert text to picture
generates a picture file with the text. Some other samples in: http://www.imagemagick.org/Usage/text/

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Look up a unicode character by name
[Update! Thanks to a tip from ioggstream, I've fixed both of the bugs mentioned below.] You, yes, 𝙔𝙊𝙐, can be the terror of the Internet! Why use normal, boring bullet points in your text, when you could use a ROTATED HEAVY BLACK HEART BULLET (❥)!? (Which would also be an awesome band name, by the way).  This script makes it easy to find unusual characters from the command line. You can then cut and paste them or, if you're using a GTK application, type Control+Shift+U followed by the code point number (e.g., 2765) and then a SPACE.  USAGE: Put this script in a file (I called mine "ugrep") and make it executable. Run it from the command line like so,  $ ugrep heart  The output will look like this,  ☙ U+2619 REVERSED ROTATED FLORAL HEART BULLET ♡ U+2661 WHITE HEART SUIT ♥ U+2665 BLACK HEART SUIT ❣ U+2763 HEAVY HEART EXCLAMATION MARK ORNAMENT ❤ U+2764 HEAVY BLACK HEART ❥ U+2765 ROTATED HEAVY BLACK HEART BULLET ❦ U+2766 FLORAL HEART ❧ U+2767 ROTATED FLORAL HEART BULLET ⺖ U+2E96 CJK RADICAL HEART ONE ⺗ U+2E97 CJK RADICAL HEART TWO ⼼ U+2F3C KANGXI RADICAL HEART  You can, of course, use regular expressions. For example, if you are looking for the "pi" symbol, you could do this:  $ ugrep '\bpi\b'  REQUIREMENTS: Although this is written in Bash, it assumes you have Perl installed because it greps through the Perl Unicode character name module (/usr/lib/perl5/Unicode/CharName.pm). Note that it would not have made more sense to write this in Perl, since the CharName.pm module doesn't actually include a subroutine for looking up a character based on the description. (Weird.)  BUGS: In order to fit this script in the commandlinefu limits, a couple bugs were added. ① Astral characters beyond the BMP (basic multilingual plane) are not displayed correctly, but see below. ② Perl code from the perl module being grepped is sometimes extraneously matched.  MISFEATURES: Bash's printf cannot, given a Unicode codepoint, print the resulting character to the terminal. GNU's coreutils printf (usually "/usr/bin/printf") can do so, but it is brokenly pedantic about how many hexadecimal digits follow the escape sequence and will actually die with an error if you give the wrong number. This is especially annoying since Unicode code points are usually variable length with implied leading zeros. The CharNames.pm file represents BMP characters as 4 hexits, but astral characters as 5. In the actual version of this script that I use, I've kludged around this misfeature by zero-padding to 8 hexits like so,  $ /usr/bin/printf "\U$(printf "%08x" 0x$hex)"  TIP 1: The author recommends "xsel" for command line cut-and-paste. For example,  $ ugrep biohazard | xsel  TIP 2: In Emacs, instead of running this command in a subshell, you can type Unicode code points directly by pressing Control-Q first, but you'll likely want to change the default input from octal to hexadecimal. (setq read-quoted-char-radix 16).  TIP 3: Of course, if you're using X, and you want to type one of the more common unusual characters, it's easiest of all to do it with your Compose (aka Multi) key. For example, hitting [Compose] <3 types ♥.

Set GIT_COMMITTER_DATE = GIT_AUTHOR_DATE for all the git commits

shell function to make gnu info act like man.
I use this alias in my bashrc. The --vi-keys option makes info use vi-like and less-like key bindings.

quick and dirty formatting for HTML code
Finds all the closing tags in a HTML document via non-greedy regex and adds a linefeed for easier reading/editing . sed -i.bak -r 's_(/[^>]*?>)_\1\n_g' filename.html . This will save a copy of filename.html as filename.html.bak and then add the linefeeds to the original file

Convert GoogleCL gmail contacts to cone adress book
Full Command: $ google contacts list name,name,email|perl -pne 's%^((?!N\/A)(.+?)),((?!N\/A)(.+?)),([a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+))%${1}:${3} %imx'|grep -oP '^((?!N\/A)(.+?)) ' | sort You'll need googlecl and python-gdata. First setup google cl via: $ google Then give your PC access $ google contacts list name,email Then do the command, save it or use this one to dump it in the cone-address.txt file in your home dir: $ google contacts list name,name,email | perl -p -n -e 's%^((?!N\/A)(.+?)),((?!N\/A)(.+?)),([a-z0-9\._-]+\@([a-z0-9][a-z0-9-]*[a-z0-9]\.)+([a-z]+\.)?([a-z]+))%${1}:${3} %imx' | grep -o -P '^((?!N\/A)(.+?)) ' | sort > ~/cone-adress.txt Then import into cone. It filters out multiple emails, and contacts with no email that have N/A. (Picasa photo persons without email for example...)


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