Commands by tokland (1)

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disable history for current shell session

Create a directory and go inside it
$_ expands to the last argument of the last command that was executed

Use a var with more text only if it exists
See "Parameter Expansion" in the bash manpage. They refer to this as "Use Alternate Value", but we're including the var in the at alternative.

Print Memory Utilization Percentage For a specific process and it's children
Change the name of the process and what is echoed to suit your needs. The brackets around the h in the grep statement cause grep to skip over "grep httpd", it is the equivalent of grep -v grep although more elegant.

Find a file's package or list a package's contents.
This is the fastest method to search the Debian package database. Requires the dlocate package. The dlocate db updates periodically, but you may force an update with # dlocate-update

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

On Screen micro display for battery and CPU temperature. nifty, small, omnipresent
My firefox overheats my cpu, sometimes above 90 degrees Celsius ( hence the name? ) To keep an eye on temperature, I put this command inside KAlarm ( a kind of cron) to be repeated every minute, for 5 seconds, color red ( default for osd_cat). Its pretty, ultra small, displays a micro 2 lines text on every desktop and over everything and do not steal focus or interrupt any task. I get the information passively, in the low profile bottom of the screen. Of course you can use it inside a terminal. Just do it: watch -n 60 'acpi -t | osd_cat -p bottom'

Print every Nth line
Sometimes commands give you too much feedback. Perhaps 1/100th might be enough. If so, every() is for you. $ my_verbose_command | every 100 will print every 100th line of output. Specifically, it will print lines 100, 200, 300, etc If you use a negative argument it will print the *first* of a block, $ my_verbose_command | every -100 It will print lines 1, 101, 201, 301, etc The function wraps up this useful sed snippet: $ ... | sed -n '0~100p' don't print anything by default $ sed -n starting at line 0, then every hundred lines ( ~100 ) print. $ '0~100p' There's also some bash magic to test if the number is negative: we want character 0, length 1, of variable N. $ ${N:0:1} If it *is* negative, strip off the first character ${N:1} is character 1 onwards (second actual character).

Show apps that use internet connection at the moment. (Multi-Language)
Show apps that use internet connection at the moment. Can be used to discover what programms create internet traffic. Skip the part after awk to get more details, though it will not work showing only unique processes. This version will work with other languages such as Spanish and Portuguese, if the word for "ESTABLISHED" still contain the fragment "STAB"(e.g. "ESTABELECIDO")

Route outbound SMTP connections through a addtional IP address rather than your primary


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