Commands by tommed (2)

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Update twitter via curl (and also set the "from" bit)
An improvement of the original (at: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/2872/update-twitter-via-curl) in the sense that you see a "from cURL" under your status message instead of just a "from API" ;-) Twitter automatically links it to the cURL home page.

move contents of the current directory to the parent directory, then remove current directory.
I think this is less resource consuming than the previous examples

Retrofit a shebang to an existing script
Function to add a shebang to an existing script, handy if you forgot to add it in the first place.

Check if your webserver supports gzip compression with curl

GREP a PDF file.
PDF files are simultaneously wonderful and heinous. They are wonderful in being ubiquitous and mostly being cross platform. They are heinous in being very difficult to work with from the command line, search, grep, use only the text inside the PDF, or use outside of proprietary products. xpdf is a wonderful set of PDF tools. It is on many linux distros and can be installed on OS X. While primarily an open PDF viewer for X, xpdf has the tool "pdftotext" that can extract formated or unformatted text from inside a PDF that has text. This text stream can then be further processed by grep or other tool. The '-' after the file name directs output to stdout rather than to a text file the same name as the PDF. Make sure you use version 3.02 of pdftotext or later; earlier versions clipped lines. The lines extracted from a PDF without the "-layout" option are very long. More paragraphs. Use just to test that a pattern exists in the file. With "-layout" the output resembles the lines, but it is not perfect. xpdf is available open source at http://www.foolabs.com/xpdf/

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

pipe output to notify-send
you can put almost any command. $notify-send -t 0 "MOTD" "$(sed -n '/#^4/,/#$4/{/#^4\|#$4/!p}' motd2 | cut -d# -f2)" $notify-send -t 0 "readfile" "$(while read mess; do echo $mess;done < motd2)"

Force wrap all text to 80 columns in Vim
This is assuming that you're editing some file that has not been wrapped at 80 columns, and you want it to be wrapped. While in Vim, enter ex mode, and set the textwidth to 80 columns: $ :set textwidth=80 Then, press: $ gg to get to the top of the file, and: $ gqG to wrap every line from the top to the bottom of the file at 80 characters. Of course, this will lose any indentation blocks you've setup if typing up some source code, or doing type setting. You can make modifications to this command as needed, as 'gq' is the formatting command you want, then you could send the formatting to a specific line in the file, rather than to the end of the file. $ gq49G Will apply the format from your current cursor location to the 49th row. And so on.

Find the process you are looking for minus the grepped one
As an alternative to using an additional grep -v grep you can use a simple regular expression in the search pattern (first letter is something out of the single letter list ;-)) to drop the grep command itself.

Get information on your graphics card on linux (such as graphics memory size)
probably only works if you have one graphics card. used this: http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/howto-find-linux-vga-video-card-ram/ as reference can be expanded, for example: $ lspci -v -s `lspci | awk '/VGA/{print $1}'` | sed -n '/Memory.*, prefetchable/s/.*\[size=\([^]]\+\)\]/\1/p' will just get the amount of prefetchable memory compare to: $ lshw -C display which does not give the size (it does give byte ranges and you could calculate the size from that, but that's a pain) Also uses a command which is not standard on linux; wheras lspci is a core utility provided by most systems


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