Commands by tongrider (1)

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count of down available ips

Find how far nested you are in subshells

Watch Al Jazeera Livestream directly in mplayer #jan25
One cannot call the high quality livestream directly, but command this gives you a session ID and the high quality stream. #egypt #jan25

Rename files in batch

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Cheap iftop
Shows updated status in a terminal window for connections to port '80' in a human-friendly form. Use 'watch -n1' to update every second, and 'watch -d' to highlight changes between updates. If you wish for status updates on a port other than '80', always remember to put a space afterwards so that ":80" will not match ":8080".

Graphical tree of sub-directories with files
The command finds every item within the directory and edits the output so that subdirectories are and files are output much like the tree command

Random quote from Borat
I improved a bit on the original by only using sed and extracting the quote with a matching group. Use -nE for sed on Mac OSX Use -nr for sed on Linux. Warning! The quotes from Borat are definitely offensive.

Convert a single-page PDF to a hi-res PNG, at 300dpi
If you skip this part: $ -density 300x300 you'll get a very lo-res image.

Search through files, ignoring .svn
By putting the "-not \( -name .svn -prune \)" in the very front of the "find" command, you eliminate the .svn directories in your find command itself. No need to grep them out. You can even create an alias for this command: $ alias svn_find="find . -not \( -name .svn -prune \)" Now you can do things like $ svn_find -mtime -3


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