Commands by tpaisndbgps (1)

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combine `mkdir foo && cd foo` into a single function `mcd foo`
I find that I create a directory and then cd into that directory quite often. I found this little function on the internets somewhere and thought I'd share it. Just copy-paste it into you ~/.bash_profile and then `source ~/.bash_profile`.

Remind yourself to leave in 15 minutes
If you spend most of your time in front of the terminal, leave is a useful reminder. Leave can have absolute form: leave 1555 reminds you to leave at 3:55PM

fetch all revisions of a specific file in an SVN repository
exported files will get a .r23 extension (where 23 is the revision number)

Remove all backup files in my home directory
I use this simple command for remove all backup files generated usually by editors like Vim and Emacs.

Find public IP when behind a random router (also see description)
Depends on GET. You can also replace GET with curl, or `wget -qO -` if GET isn't available.

Watch YouTube and other Flash videos via mplayer (or whatever)
Many sites with Flash video players will download video files to /tmp on Linux, with temporary filenames like "FlashbGTHm4". These will often play in mplayer, totem, or other movie playing software. You must first navigate to a video page, let it start loading, and then pause playback.

Add the time to BASH prompt
Adds the time in 12hr AM/PM format to the beginning of a prompt. Change \@ to \t for 24-hour time or \T for 12hr without AM/PM. To keep the time the next time you open a terminal, edit ~/.bashrc and stick the command at the bottom.

Find the package that installed a command

Find the modified time (mtime) for a file

External IP (raw data)
can be used in script like : echo $(wget -qO- http://utils.admin-linux.fr/ip.php)


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