Commands by traviswills (0)

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Hiding and Show files on Mac OS X
These commands will mark a file as hidden or visible to Mac OS X Finder. Notice the capitol V vs the lowercase v. This will also work for directories. setfile -a V foo.bar; // This marks the file invisible setfile -a v foo.bar; // This marks the file visible I have also found that adding the following aliases are helpful: alias hide='setfile -a V' alias show='setfile -a v'

List docker volumes by container

Directory Tree
tree has lots of parms - man is your friend

a function to find the fastest DNS server
http://public-dns.info gives a list of online dns servers. you need to change the country in url (br in this url) with your country code. this command need some time to ping all IP in list.

Display command lines visible on commandlinefu.com homepage
Uses the fabulous Hpricot library to parse HTML from Ruby. Extracts all elements of "command' class and displays unescaped text from inside these elements. The following command can help install dependencies (apart from Ruby itself) $ gem sources -a http://gems.github.com && sudo gem install why-hpricot

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Wait for an already launched program to stop before starting a new command.
Referring to the original post, if you are using $! then that means the process is a child of the current shell, so you can just use `wait $!`. If you are trying to wait for a process created outside of the current shell, then the loop on `kill -0 $PID` is good; although, you can't get the exit status of the process.

Adding specific CustomLog for each Virtual Domain of Apache

Share a file quickly using a python web server
Raise your hand if you haven't used this at least once to share a directory quickly

sed : using colons as separators instead of forward slashes
Having to escape forwardslashes when using sed can be a pain. However, it's possible to instead of using / as the separator to use : . I found this by trying to substitute $PWD into my pattern, like so $ sed "s/~.*/$PWD/" file.txt Of course, $PWD will expand to a character string that begins with a / , which will make sed spit out an error such as "sed: -e expression #1, char 8: unknown option to `s'". So simply changing it to $ sed "s:~.*:$PWD:" file.txt did the trick.


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