Commands by trjh (0)

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Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Execute a command at a given time
This is an alternative to cron which allows a one-off task to be scheduled for a certain time.

Add line number count as C-style comments
I often find the need to number enumerations and other lists when programming. With this command, create a new file called 'inputfile' with the text you want to number. Paste the contents of 'outputfile' back into your source file and fix the tabbing if necessary. You can also change this to output hex numbering by changing the "%02d" to "%02x". If you need to start at 0 replace "NR" with "NR-1". I adapted this from http://osxdaily.com/2010/05/20/easily-add-line-numbers-to-a-text-file/.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Length of longest line of code
Here's an awk version.

Remove security limitations from PDF documents using ghostscript (for Windows)
#4345 also works under windows

Google verbatim search on your terminal
Put it in your ~/.bashrc usage: google word1 word2 word3... google '"this search gets quoted"'

LIst svn commits by user for a date range
Outputs a quick summary of the svn commits for a user over a date range with the detail revision logs including comments and files affected. Useful for searching for a particular change or reporting by user.

Get playlist for Livestream on YouTube

Replace Solaris vmstat numbers with human readable format
% cat ph-vmstat.awk # Return human readable numbers function hrnum(a) { b = a ; if (a > 1000000) { b = sprintf("%2.2fM", a/1000000) ; } else if (a > 1000) { b = sprintf("%2.2fK", a/1000) ; } return(b) ; } # Return human readable storage function hrstorage(a) { b = a ; if (a > 1024000) { b = sprintf("%2.2fG", a/1024/1024) ; } else if (a > 1024) { b = sprintf("%2.2fM", a/1024) ; } return(b) ; } OFS=" " ; $1 !~ /[0-9].*/ {print} $1 ~ /[0-9].*/ { $4 = hrstorage($4) ; $5 = hrstorage($5) ; $9 = hrnum($9) ; $10 = hrnum($10) ; $17 = hrnum($17) ; $18 = hrnum($18) ; $19 = hrnum($19) ; print ; }


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