Commands by true (1)

  • USAGE: gate listening_port host port Creates listening socket and connects to remote device at host:port. It uses pipes for connection between two sockets. Traffic which goes through pipes is wrote to stdout. I use it for debug network scripts.


    1
    gate() { mkfifo /tmp/sock1 /tmp/sock2 &> /dev/null && nc -p $1 -l < /tmp/sock1 | tee /tmp/sock2 & PID=$! && nc $2 $3 < /tmp/sock2 | tee /tmp/sock1; kill -KILL $PID; rm -f /tmp/sock1 /tmp/sock2 ; }
    true · 2009-09-25 08:10:23 3

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