Commands by truemilk (3)

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Find all files with root SUID or SGID executables
Discovering all executables on your system that can be run as another user, especially root, is critical for system security. The above command will find those files with have SUID or SGID bits set and are owned by the root user or group.

list files recursively by size

Lookup errno defintions
Calls the POSIX strerror() function to look up the meaning of integer ERRNOs set by some functions.

Unbelievable Shell Colors, Shading, Backgrounds, Effects for Non-X
I've been using linux for almost a decade and only recently discovered that most terminals like putty, xterm, xfree86, vt100, etc., support hundreds of shades of colors, backgrounds and text/terminal effects. This simply prints out a ton of them, the output is pretty amazing. If you use non-x terminals all the time like I do, it can really be helpful to know how to tweak colors and terminal capabilities. Like: $ echo $'\33[H\33[2J'

attach to bash shell in the last container you started

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

Create QR codes from a URL.
QR codes are those funny square 2d bar codes that everyone seems to be pointing their smart phones at. Try the following... $ qrurl http://xkcd.com Then open qr.*.png in your favorite image viewer. Point your the bar code reader on your smart phone at the code, and you'll shortly be reading xkcd on your phone. URLs are not the only thing that can be encoded by QR codes... short texts (to around 2K) can be encoded this way, although this function doesn't do any URL encoding, so unless you want to do that by hand it won't be useful for that.

Rename files in batch

Do the last command, but say 'y' to everything
I doubt this works with other than bash, but then again, I havent tried. The 'yes' utility is very simple, it outputs a hell of a lot of 'y's to standard input. The '!!' command means 'the last command'. So this one-lines inputs a lot of y's into the last command, aggressively agreeing to everything. For instance, when doing apt-get.

Test a serial connection
If the connection works you should see a "hello" on host A. If not: check your cabeling etc :-)


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