Commands by tungduydo (0)

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pulsed terminal clock
hypnotizing pendulum

Short and elegant way to backup a single file before you change it.
Remember to backup everything before changing it so you can restore all to normal.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Ctrl+S Ctrl+Q terminal output lock and unlock
These are simple shortcuts to pause and continue terminal output, works in most terminals and screen multiplexers like screen. You can use it to catch something if things change too fast, and scroll with Shift + PgUp PgDown. On linux console ScrollLock can also be used.

calculate in commandline with bash
Only works for integer arithmetic.

Search big files with long lines
This is a handy way to circumvent the "Maximum line length of 2048 exceeded" grep error. Once you have run the above command (or put it in your .bashrc), files can be searched using: $ lgrep search-string /file/to/search

Getting ESP and EIP addresses from running processes
'ps' let you specify the format that you want to see on the output.

Search for an active process without catching the search-process
This does the same thing as many of the 'grep' based alternatives but allows a more finite control over the output. For example if you only wanted the process ID you could change the command: $ ps -ef | awk '/mingetty/ && !/awk/ {print $2}' If you wanted to kill the returned PID's: $ ps -ef | awk '/mingetty/ && !/awk/ {print $2}' | xargs -i kill {}

Determine if a port is open with bash
For times when netcat isn't available. Will throw a Connection refused message if a port is closed. Scriptable: $ (: /dev/null && echo "OPEN" || echo "CLOSED"


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