Commands by tuxifier (2)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Make a directory named with the current date
Create a directory named with the current date in ISO 8601 format (yyyy-mm-dd). Useful for storing backups by date. The --iso switch may only work with GNU date, can use format string argument for other date versions.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Purge configuration files of removed packages on debian based systems
also search with aptitude search '~c'

Find ulimit values of currently running process
When dealing with system resource limits like max number of processes and open files per user, it can be hard to tell exactly what's happening. The /etc/security/limits.conf file defines the ceiling for the values, but not what they currently are, while $ ulimit -a will show you the current values for your shell, and you can set them for new logins in /etc/profile and/or ~/.bashrc with a command like: $ ulimit -S -n 100000 >/dev/null 2>&1 But with the variability in when those files get read (login vs any shell startup, interactive vs non-interactive) it can be difficult to know for sure what values apply to processes that are currently running, like database or app servers. Just find the PID via "ps aux | grep programname", then look at that PID's "limits" file in /proc. Then you'll know for sure what actually applies to that process.

save date and time for each command in history
for the change stay in your history file , export command by writing it into your .bashrc

find all writable (by user) files in a directory tree (use 4 for readable, 1 for executable)

Find the package that installed a command

Disable sending of start/stop characters
This command disable sending of start/stop characters. It's useful when you want to use incremental reverse history search forward shortcut (Ctrl+s). To enable again, type: $ stty -ixoff

watch the previous command
If you just executed some long command, like "ps -aefww | grep -i [m]yProcess", and if you don't want to retype it or cycle backwards in history and waste time quoting it, then you can use history substitution.

list all file-types (case-insensitive extensions) including subdirectories


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: