Commands by ubercoo (2)

  • This is a alternate command I like to use instead of TOP or HTOP to see what are the processes which are taking up the most memory on a system. It shows the username, process ID, CPU usage, Memory usage, thread ID, Number of threads associated with parent process, Resident Set Size, Virtual Memory Size, start time of the process, and command arguments. Then it's sorted by memory and showing the top 10 with head. This of course can be changed to suit you needs. I have a small system which is why Firefox is taking so much resources. Show Sample Output


    0
    watch -n .8 'ps -eaLo uname,pid,pcpu,pmem,lwp,nlwp,rss,vsz,start_time,args --sort -pmem| head -10'
    ubercoo · 2016-05-11 01:05:53 0
  • This command will find any named file types in / between two dates then will list all the metadata of those files in long format and human readable form. Adding a 't' flag to the ls command sorts the files by modified time. After all that the head -5 lists the first 5 which can be changed.


    0
    ls -laht `find / -name "*.*" -type f -newermt "2016-04-05" ! -newermt "2016-04-10"`|head -5
    ubercoo · 2016-04-19 14:26:23 0

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Tricky implementation of two-dimensional array in Bash.
Since Bash doesn't support two-dimensional arrays, you can limit your columns length by some big enough constant value ( in this example 100 ) and then index the array with i and j, or maybe write your own get() and set() methods to index the array properly like I implemented for example ( see Sample output ). For example for i=0 and j=0...99 you'll pick up one of 100 elements in the range [0,99] in the one-dimensional array. For i=1 and j=0...99 you'll pick up one of 100 elements in the range [100,199]. And so on. Be careful when using this, and remember that in fact you are always using one-dimensional array.

Edit your command in vim ex mode by <ctrl-f>
If you are in ex mode in vim i.e. you've pressed ':'. You can edit the current command by pressing <ctrl-f>

View a file with less, starting at the end of the file
The same as typing 'less filename' then 'G' or '>' or the END key. Comes in handy with shell scripts or aliases: alias weblog='less +G /var/log/httpd/access_log' alias errlog='less +G /var/log/httpd/error_log'

Get pages number of the pdf file

create thumbnail of pdf

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Get yesterday's date or a previous time
With this command you can get a previous or future date or time. Where can you use this? How about finding all files modified or created in the last 5 mins? touch -t `echo $(date -d "5 minute ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type f -newer me List all directories created since last week? touch -t `echo $(date -d "1 week ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type d -cnewer me I'm sure you can think of more ways to use it. Requires coreutils package.

Carriage return for reprinting on the same line
The above code is just an example of printing on the same line, hit Ctrl + C to stop When using echo -ne "something\r", echo will: - print "something" - dont print a new line (-n) - interpret \r as carriage return, going back to the start of the line (-e) Remember to print some white spaces after the output if your command will print lines of different sizes, mainly if one line will be smaller than the previous Edit from reading comments: You can achieve the same effect using printf (more standardized than echo): while true; do printf "%-80s\r" "$(date)"; sleep 1; done

Create a CD/DVD ISO image from disk.

Find the package that installed a command


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