Commands by unhammer (9)

  • Assuming you've written all of make -j hfst-tokenize && echo doavtter gr?dakursa|./hfst-tokenize --gtd tokeniser-gramcheck-gt-desc.pmhfst and want that to execute every time you :w in vim (or C-xC-s in Emacs), just hit and it'll turn into while true; do ( make -j hfst-tokenize && e doavtter gr?dakursa|./hfst-tokenize --gtd tokeniser-gramcheck-gt-desc.pmhfst ); inotifywait -q -e modify -e close_write *; done with the cursor right before the ')'. Hit enter, and it'll run on each save. Requires the package inotify-tools installed. Show Sample Output


    1
    echo '"\e\C-i": "\C-awhile true; do ( \C-e ); inotifywait -q -e modify -e close_write *; done\e51\C-b"' >>~/.inputrc
    unhammer · 2016-06-10 08:06:50 0
  • Say you're started "xzcat bigdata.xz | complicated-processing-program >summary" an hour ago, and you of course forgot to enable progress output (you could've just put "awk 'NR%1000==0{print NR>"/dev/stderr"}{print}'" in the pipeline but it's too late for that now). But you really want some idea of how far along your program is. Then you can run the above command to see how many % along xzcat is in reading the file. Note that this is for the GNU/Linux version of lsof; the one found on e.g. Darwin has slightly different output so the awk part may need some tweaks. Show Sample Output


    2
    f=bigdata.xz; calc "round($(lsof -o0 -o "$f"|awk '{o=substr($7,3)}END{print o}')/$(stat -c %s "$f")*100)"
    unhammer · 2015-09-19 18:27:12 3
  • rsync by itself doesn't support copying between two remote hosts, but if you use sshfs you can pretend one of them is local. If you have a passphrase-less ssh-key, you can even put this script into a cron job. A faster alternative is to run ssh-keygen on remote1 and put the pubkey into remote2:~/.ssh/authorized_keys, running rsync on remote1 (or vice versa), but the problem with that is that now a hacker on remote1 can access remote2 at any time. The above method ensures your local computer stays the weak link. Show Sample Output


    -1
    mkdir r1 && sshfs remote1:/home/user r1 && rsync r1/stuff remote2:~/backups/
    unhammer · 2013-01-11 14:12:22 0
  • Can't see it here, but the non-breaking space is highlighted :) Of course, cat -t -e achieves something similar, but less colourful. Could add more code points from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Space_%28punctuation%29#Spaces_in_Unicode Show Sample Output


    -1
    hl-nonprinting () { local C=$(printf '\033[0;36m') B=$(printf '\033[0;46m') R=$(printf '\033[0m') np=$(env printf "\u00A0\uFEFF"); sed -e "s/\t/${C}▹&$R/g" -e "s/$/${C}⁋$R/" -e "s/[$np]/${B}& $R/g";}
    unhammer · 2012-11-07 10:09:40 1
  • I don't think it's possible to give a (background) colour to the tab itself, since a tab is, IIUC, simply a command to the terminal to move to the right. Nevertheless, this "highlighting" can be helpful when working with tab-separated files. Show Sample Output


    -1
    hl-nonprinting () { local C=$(printf '\033[0;36m') R=$(printf '\033[0m'); sed -e "s/\t/${C}▹&$R/g" -e "s/$/${C}⁋$R/";}
    unhammer · 2012-11-07 09:55:48 0
  • Assumes you've cd'd to the folder in which all your git repos reside; you could run it from ~ without -maxdepth, although that might make find take quite a while longer. If you have several processor cores, but not that much ram, you might want to run git config --global pack.threads 1 first, since gc-ing can eat lots of ram. Show Sample Output


    -1
    find . -maxdepth 2 -type d -name '.git' -print0 | while read -d ''; do (cd "$REPLY"; git gc); done
    unhammer · 2012-11-07 08:38:33 0
  • basically create a .pot file from a po-file, ready for translating


    -1
    msgfilter --keep-header -i input.po -o empty.po awk -e '{}'
    unhammer · 2012-01-14 13:29:26 2
  • This will extract the differing CSS entries of two files. I've left the initial character (plus or space) in output to show the real differing line, remove the initial character to get a working CSS file. The output CSS file is usable by either adding it in a below the to original.css, or by only using the output but adding @import url("original.css"); in the beginning. This is very useful for converting Wordpress theme copies into real Wordpress child themes. Could exclude common lines within entries too, I guess, but that might not be worth the complexity. Show Sample Output


    0
    diff -U99999 original.css modified.css | awk '/^-/{next} {f=f"\n"$0} /^\+.*[^ ]/{yes=1} /}/ {if(yes){print f} f="";yes=0}'
    unhammer · 2012-01-12 07:57:22 1
  • Requires consolekit (works in e.g. Ubuntu). Here x11-display is DISPLAY Show Sample Output


    1
    ck-list-sessions
    unhammer · 2012-01-02 08:53:41 0

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