Commands by unixmonkey1055 (4)

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Read PDFs in the command line
Turns a PDF into HTML (without images) and prints it to the standard out which is picked up and interpreted by w3m.

Get current logged in users shortname

A function to find the newest file in a directory

Rotate a video file by 90 degrees CW
Change video orientation in metadata only

Mount a partition from within a complete disk dump
Suppose you made a backup of your hard disk with dd: dd if=/dev/sda of=/mnt/disk/backup.img This command enables you to mount a partition from inside this image, so you can access your files directly. Substitute PARTITION=1 with the number of the partition you want to mount (returned from sfdisk -d yourfile.img).

Multiple variable assignments from command output in BASH
It's quite easy to capture the output of a command and assign it in a shell's variable: $ day=$(date +%d) $ month=$(date +%m) But, what if we want to perform the same task with just one program invocation? Here comes the power of eval! date(1) outputs a string like "day=29; month=07; year=11" (notice the semicolons I added on purpose at date's custom output) which is a legal shell line. This like is then parsed and executed by the shell once again with the help of eval. Just setting 3 variables! Inspired by LinuxJournal's column "Dave Taylor's Work the Shell".

Compare an archive with filesystem
and you quickly know the files you changed

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Checks throughput between two nodes
This will show the throughput between two nodes. Thanks to szboardstretcher, who posted it here: http://www.linuxquestions.org/questions/linux-networking-3/quick-and-easy-way-to-measure-throughput-between-two-nodes-868998/

Write a shell script that removes files that contain a string
Deletes files in the current directory or its subdirectories that match "regexp" but handle directories, newlines, spaces, and other funky characters better than the original #13315. Also uses grep's "-q" to be quiet and quit at the first match, making this much faster. No need for awk either.


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