Commands by unixmonkey1055 (4)

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display ip address
add this alias in .bashrc to fast check the ip address of your modem router alias myip="curl -s http://myip.dk | grep '' | sed -e 's/]*>//g'"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Convert from octal format to umask
Umask is obtained subtracting 7 from each cypher of octal format. I store octal perm format in an array,then for each element of array I subtract 7. The result is the umask.

Select and Edit a File in the Current Directory
This command displays a simple menu of file names in the current directory. After the user made a choice, the command invokes the default editor to edit that file. * Without the break statement, the select command will loop forever * Setting the PS3 prompt is optional * If the user types an invalid choice (such as the letter q), then the variable $f will become an empty string. * For more information, look up the bash's select command

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Lists all listening ports together with the PID of the associated process
The PID will only be printed if you're holding a root equivalent ID.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

Mac OS X: Change Color of the ls Command
I use terminal with black background on the Mac. Unfortunately, the default ls color for the directory is blue, which is very hard to see. By including the line above in my ~/.bash_profile file, I changed the directory's color to cyan, which is easer to see. For more information on the syntax of the LSCOLORS shell variable: $ man ls I tested this command on Mac OS X Leopard

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.


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