Commands by unixmonkey12820 (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Find Duplicate Files (based on MD5 hash) -- For Mac OS X
This works on Mac OS X using the `md5` command instead of `md5sum`, which works similarly, but has a different output format. Note that this only prints the name of the duplicates, not the original file. This is handy because you can add `| xargs rm` to the end of the command to delete all the duplicates while leaving the original.

get the top 10 longest filenames

Check a server is up. If it isn't mail me.
This version uses netcat to check a particular service.

FInd the 10 biggest files taking up disk space
This combines the above two command into one. Note that you can leave off the last two commands and simply run the command as "find /home/ -type f -exec du {} \; 2>/dev/null | sort -n | tail -n 10" The last two commands above just convert the output into human readable format.

Prefix command output with duration for each line
Prefixes each output line with time between it and the previous one.

MoscowML with editable input-line and history
Works also with SML/NJ and other interpreters or tools with interactive environments.

type partial command, kill this command, check something you forgot, yank the command, resume typing.
Example : $ vim /etc/fstab ## damn $ $ sudo ## like a boss. Example 2 : $ sudo vim /root/bin/ ##uh... autocomplete doesn't work... $ $ sudo ls /root/bin ##ah! that's the name of the file! $ sudo vim /root/bin/ ##resume here! Thanks readline!

a simple bash one-liner to create php file and call php function

Add the time to BASH prompt
Adds the time in 12hr AM/PM format to the beginning of a prompt. Change \@ to \t for 24-hour time or \T for 12hr without AM/PM. To keep the time the next time you open a terminal, edit ~/.bashrc and stick the command at the bottom.

List every docker's name, IP and port mapping


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