Commands by unixmonkey22563 (1)

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convert pdf to graphic file format (jpg , png , tiff ... )
need imagemagick package

Rename files in batch

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Multi line grep using sed and specifying open/close tags
This line does not include your closing tag in the output.

Take screenshot through SSH
When connected to a box via ssh you can do a quick screenshot of that box using this command. After that you can rscp it over to your box and look at it.

Btrfs: Find file names with checksum errors
Btrfs reports the inode numbers of files with failed checksums. Use `find` to lookup the file names of those inodes. The files may need to be deleted and replaced with backups.

Split a file one piece at a time, when using the split command isn't an option (not enough disk space)
bs = buffer size (basically defined the size of a "unit" used by count and skip) count = the number of buffers to copy (16m * 32 = 1/2 gig) skip = (32 * 2) we are grabbing piece 3...which means 2 have already been written so skip (2 * count) i will edit this later if i can to make this all more understandable

Copy all files, including hidden files, recursively without traversing backward
You could do the following, however, brace expansion with {} is not defined in POSIX, and therefore not guaranteed to work in all shells. But, if it does, it's more convenient (although it's certainly not less typing): $ cp -r {*,.??*} /dest Sometimes there are times when I need to cp(1), mv(1) or rm(1) files recursively, but don't want to traverse the previous directory by following ../../../../ etc out of the current directory. This command prevents that. The secret sauce is ".??*". The file globbing ensures that it must start with a dot, and be followed by at least two characters. So, three characters must exist in the filename, which eliminates "." and "..".

Delete all non-printing characters from a file
tr has some predefined sets of characters that are more convenient to use than characters codes

Commandline document conversion with Libreoffice
In this example, the docx gets converted to Open Document .odt format. For other formats, you'll need to specify the correct filter (Hint: see "Comments" link below for a nice list).


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