Commands by unixmonkey2868 (1)

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show installed but unused linux headers, image, or modules
will show: installed linux headers, image, or modules: /^ii/!d avoiding current kernel: /'"$(uname -r | sed "s/\(.*\)-\([^0-9]\+\)/\1/")"'/d only application names: s/^[^ ]* [^ ]* \([^ ]*\).*/\1/ avoiding stuff without a version number: /[0-9]/!d

Programmatic way to find and set your timezone

Rename files in batch

C one-liners
$ /lib/ld-linux.so.2 is the runtime linker/loader for ELF binaries on Linux. =(cmd) is a zsh trick to take the output for the command "inside" it and save it to a temporary file. $ echo -e 'blah' | gcc -x c -o /dev/stdout - pipes the C source to gcc. -x c tells gcc that it's compiling C (which is required if it's reading from a pipe). -o /dev/stdout - tells it to write the binary to standard output and read the source from standard input. because of the the =() thing, the compiled output is stashed in a tempfile, which the loader then runs and executes, and the shell tosses the tempfile away immediately after running it.

Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

Change gnome-shell wallpaper

Check for Firewall Blockage.
This is just one method of checking to see if an IP is blocked via IP tables or CSF. Simple and to the point. Replace xx.xx.xx.xx with the IP you wish to check.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

convert unixtime to human-readable with awk
- convert unixtime to human-readable with awk - useful to read logfiles with unix-timestamps, f.e. squid-log: sudo tail -f /var/log/squid3/access.log | awk '{ print strftime("%c ", $1) $0; }


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