Commands by unixmonkey38088 (1)

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Print process run time, average CPU usage, and maximum memory usage on exit
Bash has a built-in time command which provides less functionality than the real time command. Thus we reference /usr/bin/time directly. Since the command isn't very easy to remember you could alias it to something like "cputime" or even just "time".

Remove EXIF data from images with progress

simple backup with rsync
With this cron, rsync begins to sinchronize the contents of the local directory on /[VIPdirectory] with the directory /backup/[VIPdirectory] on the remote server X.X.X.X. Previously we need working on public/private-keys ssh to guarantee the acces to the remote server on X.X.X.X

Extract the contents of an RPM package to your current directory without installing them.
This assumes you have the 'rpm', 'rpm2cpio' and 'cpio' packages installed. This will extract the contents of the RPM package to your current directory. This is useful for working with the files that the package provides without installing the package on your system. Might be useful to create a temporary directory to hold the packages before running the extraction: $ mkdir /tmp/new-package/; cd /tmp/new-package

Exclude grep from your grepped output of ps (alias included in description)
Surround the first letter of what you are grepping with square brackets and you won't have to spawn a second instance of grep -v. You could also use an alias like this (albeit with sed): alias psgrep='ps aux | grep $(echo $1 | sed "s/^\(.\)/[\1]/g")'

Print stack trace of a core file without needing to enter gdb interactively
The pstack command prints a stack trace of running processes without needing to attach a debugger, but what about core files? The answer, of course, is to use this command. Usage: gdbbt program corefile

shuffle lines via perl
Same, without modules... Probably smarter option: just use the shuf command or even sort -R.

Compare an archive with filesystem
and you quickly know the files you changed

check open ports (both ipv4 and ipv6)
While `lsof` will work, why not use the tool designed explicitly for this job? (If not run as root, you will only see the names of PID you own)

Matrix Style
Same as above but slooooow it down


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