Commands by unixmonkey3883 (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Customer Friendly free
makes more sense to customers XD

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Remove several files with ease
Rather than typing out all 10 files, you can use brace expansion to do the trick for you. This is useful for backup files, numbered files, or any files with a repeating pattern. Gives more control than 'rm file*' as I might want to keep others around.

Empty the linux buffer cache

Stream YouTube URL directly to mplayer.
Streams youtube video with v=ID directly into the mplayer. If exists, it uses the HD-quality stream. If you don't want to watch it in HD-quality, you can use the shorter form: $ID=52DnUo6wJto; mplayer -fs $(echo "http://youtube.com/get_video.php?&video_id=$ID$(wget -qO - 'http://youtube.com/watch?v='$ID | perl -ne 'print $1."&asv=" if /^.*(&t=.*?)&.*$/')")

Show only existing executable dirs in PATH using only builtin bash commands
Finds executable and existing directories in your path that can be useful if migrating a profile script to another system. This is faster and smaller than any other method due to using only bash builtin commands. See also: + http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/743/list-all-execs-in-path-usefull-for-grepping-the-resulting-list + http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html

Convert JSON to YAML
Requires installing json2yaml via npm: npm install -g json2yaml (can also pipe from stdin) Ref: https://www.npmjs.com/package/json2yaml

Show GCC-generated optimization commands when using the "-march=native" or "-mtune=native" switches for compilation.
You can tell GCC to automatically select optimization commands and produce optimized code for the local machine (the one compiling the code), but you can't normally see what switches have been selected and used unless you append a "-v" and pause compilation.

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Display the history and optionally grep
Place this in your .bash_profile and you can use it two different ways. If you issue 'h' on its own, then it acts like the history command. If you issue: $ h cd Then it will display all the history with the word 'cd'


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