Commands by unixmonkey46191 (1)

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Rename all (jpg) files written as 3 number in 4 numbers.
Useful if you have a list of images called 1 2 3 4 and so on, you can adapt it to rewrite it as 4 (in this example) 0-padded number.

Use a regex as a field separator awk

Put uppercase letters in curly brackets in a BibTeX database
It is often recommended to enclose capital letters in a BibTeX file in braces, so the letters will not be transformed to lower case, when imported from LaTeX. This is an attempt to apply this rule to a BibTeX database file. DO NOT USE sed '...' input.bib > input.bib as it will empty the file! How it works: $ /^\s*[^@%]/ Apply the search-and-replace rule to lines that start (^) with zero or more white spaces (\s*), followed by any character ([...]) that is *NOT* a "@" or a "%" (^@%). $ s===g Search (s) for some stuff and replace by other stuff. Do that globally (g) for all matches in each processed line. $ \([A-Z][A-Z]*\)\([^}A-Z]\|},$\) Matches at least one uppercase letter ([A-Z][A-Z]*) followed by a character that is EITHER not "}" and not a capital letter ([^}A-Z]) OR (|) it actually IS a "}", which is followed by "," at the end of the line ($). Putting regular expressions in escaped parentheses (\( and \), respectively) allows to dereference the matched string later. $ {\1}\2 Replace the matched string by "{", followed by part 1 of the matched string (\1), followed by "}", followed by the second part of the matched string (\2). I tried this with GNU sed, only, version 4.2.1.

Create a DOS floppy image
mount with: mount -t msdos -o loop ./floppy.img /tmp/mnt

Watch active calls on an Asterisk PBX
Only the number of calls nothing else.

Control ssh connection
SSH can be controlled trough an ~ escape sequence. Example, to terminate the current ssh connection, type a newline, then the ~ character, and last a . character. This is useful eg when an ssh connection hangs after you reboot a machine and the connection hangs.

Single words from Amazon Kindle 3 notes
You can use any dictionary you want, in any language. This command will output all single-word annotations that you have underlined in your Kindle device (provided the file) given a list of language-specific words. If you want to learn vocabulary, this command is ideal.

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Sorted, recursive long file listing
Tells you everything you could ever want to know about all files and subdirectories. Great for package creators. Totally secure too. On my Slackware box, this gets set upon login: $ LS_OPTIONS='-F -b -T 0 --color=auto' and $ alias ls='/bin/ls $LS_OPTIONS' which works great.

find geographical location of an ip address
a shorter version


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