Commands by unixmonkey5049 (1)

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Check how far along (in %) your program is in a file
Imagine you've started a long-running process that involves piping data, but you forgot to add the progress-bar option to a command. e.g. $ xz -dc bigdata.xz | complicated-processing-program > summary . This command uses lsof to see how much data xz has read from the file. $ lsof -o0 -o -Fo FILENAME Display offsets (-o), in decimal (-o0), in parseable form (-Fo) This will output something like: . p12607 f3 o0t45187072 . Process id (p), File Descriptor (f), Offset (o) . We stat the file to get its size $ stat -c %s FILENAME . Then we plug the values into awk. Split the line at the letter t: -Ft Define a variable for the file's size: -s=$(stat...) Only work on the offset line: /^o/ . Note this command was tested using the Linux version of lsof. Because it uses lsof's batch option (-F) it may be portable. . Thanks to @unhammer for the brilliant idea.

automatically ditch old versions in a conflict
This is not exactly a commandline, but a vim macro to automatically ditch the "old" version of a conflict when dealing with the naster

Mount a partition from dd disk image
Assuming we have a disk image, ie. created by $dd if=/dev/sda of=image.dd we can check the image's partition layout with $fdisk -ul image.dd then, we substitute "x" with starting sector of the partition we want to mount. This example assumes that the disk uses 512 B sectors

Find the date of the first commit in a git repository
Finds the date of the first commit in a git repository branch

Add Password Protection to a file your editing in vim.
While I love gpg and truecrypt there's some times when you just want to edit a file and not worry about keys or having to deal needing extra software on hand. Thus, you can use vim's encrypted file format. For more info on vim's encrypted files visit: http://www.vim.org/htmldoc/editing.html#encryption

strip config files of comments
some configuration files, particularly those installed by default as part of a package, have tons of comment lines, to help you know what's possible to configure, and what it means. That's nice, but sometimes you just want to see what specifically what _has_ been configured. That's when I use the above snippet, which I save as a bash alias 'nocom' (for 'no comments'). Apache default config files are perfect examples of when/why this script is handy.

Get all shellcode on binary file from objdump
Tired copy paste to get opcode from objdump huh ? Get more @ http://gunslingerc0de.wordpress.com

Analyze awk fields
translate and number lines is simpler and you use tr to choose your delimiter (eg for csv files)

Copy all files, including hidden files, recursively without traversing backward
You could do the following, however, brace expansion with {} is not defined in POSIX, and therefore not guaranteed to work in all shells. But, if it does, it's more convenient (although it's certainly not less typing): $ cp -r {*,.??*} /dest Sometimes there are times when I need to cp(1), mv(1) or rm(1) files recursively, but don't want to traverse the previous directory by following ../../../../ etc out of the current directory. This command prevents that. The secret sauce is ".??*". The file globbing ensures that it must start with a dot, and be followed by at least two characters. So, three characters must exist in the filename, which eliminates "." and "..".

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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