Commands by unixmonkey7434 (1)

  • Use this if you can't type repeated killall commands fast enough to kill rapidly spawning processes. If a process keeps spawning copies of itself too rapidly, it can do so faster than a single killall can catch them and kill them. Retyping the command at the prompt can be too slow too, even with command history retrieval. Chaining a few killalls on single command line can start up the next killall more quickly. The first killall will get most of the processes, except for some that were starting up in the meanwhile, the second will get most of the rest, and the third mops up.


    -2
    killall rapidly_spawning_process ; killall rapidly_spawning_process ; killall rapidly_spawning_process
    unixmonkey7434 · 2010-05-20 00:26:10 2

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