Commands by unixmonkey8311 (1)

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list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Install pip with Proxy
Installs pip packages defining a proxy

Export OPML from Google Reader

Go up multiple levels of directories quickly and easily.
Change to your taste. Much quicker than having to add 'cd' every time. Add it to your .bashrc or .bash_profile.

Reuse all parameter of the previous command line
!* is all of the arguments to the previous command rather than just the last one. This is useful in many situations. Here's a simple example: $ vi cd /stuff oops! [exit vi, twice] $ !* expands to: cd /stuff

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Multi-thread any command
For instance: $ find . -type f -name '*.wav' -print0 |xargs -0 -P 3 -n 1 flac -V8 will encode all .wav files into FLAC in parallel. Explanation of xargs flags: -P [max-procs]: Max number of invocations to run at once. Set to 0 to run all at once [potentially dangerous re: excessive RAM usage]. -n [max-args]: Max number of arguments from the list to send to each invocation. -0: Stdin is a null-terminated list. I use xargs to build parallel-processing frameworks into my scripts like the one here: http://pastebin.com/1GvcifYa

Syntax Highlight your Perl code
This uses Text::Highlight to output the specified Perl file with syntax highlighting. A better alternative is my App::perlhl - find it on the CPAN: http://p3rl.org/App::perlhl

git remove files which have been deleted
This command handles git rm'ing files that you've deleted.

Perform sed substitution on all but the last line of input
In this simple example the command will add a comma to the end of every line except the last. I found this really useful when programatically constructing sql scripts. See sample output for example.


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