Commands by unixmonkey8473 (1)

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Query well known ports list
Uses the file located in /etc/services

formatting number with comma
it is not work with Cygwin's bash3.X. Test in Linux. use printf "%'f" number while it is floating point number

ring the bell

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Print all the lines between 10 and 20 of a file
Similarly, if you want to print from 10 to the end of line you can use: sed -n '10,$p' filename This is especially useful if you are dealing with a large file. Sometimes you just want to extract a sample without opening the entire file. Credit goes to wbx & robert at the comments section of http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/348/get-line1000-from-text.#comment

Changes standard mysql client output to 'less'.
Changes standard mysql client output to 'less'. In another words makes query results of mysql command line client to look much better.

convert uppercase filenames in current directory to lowercase
as commented by Urk...

list files with last modified at the end

find which of the zip files contains the file you're searching for
This command find which of your zip (or jar) files (when you have lots of them) contains a file you're searching for. It's useful when you have a lot of zip (or jar) files and need to know in which of them the file is archived. It's most common with .jar files when you have to know which of the .jar files contains the java class you need. To find in jar files, you must change "zip" to "jar" in the "find" command. The [internal file name] must be changed to the file name you're searching that is archived into one of the zip/jar files. Before run this command you must step into the directory that contains the zip or jar files.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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