Commands by unixyangg (1)

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High resolution video screen recording
$ gorecord foo.mp4 I've tried all of the screen recorders available for Linux and this is easily the best. xvidcap segfaults; VNC is too much hassle. There are alternatives of this command already here that I am just too lazy to reply to. Messing with the frames per second option, -r, 25 seems to be the best. Any lower and the video will look like a flipbook, if it records at all - -r 10 won't - any faster is the same, oddly enough. Edit: CLF doesn't like my long command to add audio, so here it is in the description. $ goaddaudio() ${ $if [ $# != 3 ]; then $ echo 'goaddaudio < audio > < src video > < dst video >' $ return $ fi $ $ f=goaddaudio$RANDOM $ ffmpeg -i "$2" &> $f $ d=$( grep Duration $f | awk '{print $2}' | tr -d ',' ) && $ rm $f && $ ffmpeg -i "$1" -i "$2" -r 25 -ab 192k -ar 44100 -sameq -t $d "$3" $}

List the URLs of tabs of the frontmost Chrome window in OS X
This also works with Safari if you just change the application name. Replace $ window 1 with $ windows to list the URLs of tabs in all windows instead of only the frontmost window. This also includes titles: $ osascript -e{'set o to""','tell app"google chrome"','repeat with t in tabs of window 1','set o to o&url of t&"\n"&" "&title of t&"\n"',end,end}|sed \$d .

Remove a file whose name begins with a dash ( - ) character
Using the redundant ./ directory information prevents the dash from occurring at the beginning of the filename, and being interpreted as an option of the rm command. Also works using: $ rm -- -filename

Download all data from Google Ngram Viewer
To learn more about Google Ngram Viewer: http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/info

View all date formats, Quick Reference Help Alias
If you have used bash for any scripting, you've used the date command alot. It's perfect for using as a way to create filename's dynamically within aliases,functions, and commands like below.. This is actually an update to my first alias, since a few commenters (below) had good observations on what was wrong with my first command. # creating a date-based ssh-key for askapache.github.com $ ssh-keygen -f ~/.ssh/`date [email protected]$HOSTNAME-%m-%d-%g` -C '[email protected]' $ # /home/gpl/.ssh/[email protected] # create a tar+gzip backup of the current directory $ tar -czf $(date +$HOME/.backups/%m-%d-%g-%R-`sed -u 's/\//#/g'

FizzBuzz in one line of Bash
The (in)famous "FizzBuzz" programming challenge, answered in a single line of Bash code. The "|column" part at the end merely formats the output a bit, so if "column" is not installed on your machine you can simply omit that part. Without "|column", the solution only uses 75 characters. The version below is expanded to multiple lines, with comments added. for i in {1..100} # Use i to loop from "1" to "100", inclusive. do ((i % 3)) && # If i is not divisible by 3... x= || # ...blank out x (yes, "x= " does that). Otherwise,... x=Fizz # ...set x to the string "Fizz". ((i % 5)) || # If i is not divisible by 5, skip (there's no "&&")... x+=Buzz # ...Otherwise, append (not set) the string "Buzz" to x. echo ${x:-$i} # Print x unless it is blanked out. Otherwise, print i. done | column # Wrap output into columns (not part of the test).

Synthesize text as speech
The Festival Speech Synthesis System converts text into sound. Or: links -dump http://youfavoritewebsite.com | festival --tts

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

tar+pbzip2 a dir

Sorted list of established destination connections
no need grep. its redundant when awk is present.


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