Commands by vdo (1)

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HTTP GET request on wireshark remotly

Count all conections estabilished on gateway

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested

Prefix every line with a timestamp
Useful to add a timestamp to every line printed to stdout. You can use `-Ins` instead of `-Iseconds` if you want more precision.

Use curl to save an MP3 stream
I use this with cron to timeshift radio programs from a station's live stream. You will get an error message at the end like "curl: (28) Operation timed out after 10000 milliseconds with 185574 bytes received"; to suppress that but not other error messages, you can append "2>&1 | grep -v "(28)"" to the end of the command.

Display a cool clock on your terminal
This command displays a clock on your terminal which updates the time every second. Press Ctrl-C to exit. A couple of variants: A little bit bigger text: $ watch -t -n1 "date +%T|figlet -f big" You can try other figlet fonts, too. Big sideways characters: $ watch -n 1 -t '/usr/games/banner -w 30 $(date +%M:%S)' This requires a particular version of banner and a 40-line terminal or you can adjust the width ("30" here).

Run a command on a remote machine
This counts the number of httpd processes running.

Show used disk space:

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Find and list users who talk like "lolcats"
Greps IRC logs for phrases and lists users who said them.


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