Commands by vigo (5)

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prints message in given argument on on center of screen
$ function echox { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines))) $(( ($(tput cols) - $(echo "${#1}"))/2 ))`"$1"`tput cup $(tput lines) $(( $(tput cols)-1 ))`; } echox prints given argument on bottom line center screen in terminal $ function echoxy { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines)/2)) $(( ($(tput cols) - $(echo "${#1}"))/2))`"$1"`tput cup $(tput lines) $(( $(tput cols)-1 ))`; } exhoxy prints given argument center screen $ function echos { echo `tput cup $(($(tput lines)-2)) $(($(tput cols)-$(echo ${#1})))&&tput sc`"$1"`tput cup $(($(tput lines)-2)) 0 && tput rc`; } $ while [ 1 ]; do echos "`date`"; done echos prints date and time on second from last line (used as status message) you can easily use these functions by placing them in your .bashrc file, make sure to source your .bashrc once you do

how to allow a program to listen through the firewall
To allow a program ("programmaautorizzato" in example) to listen through the firewall

Reverse SSH
this command from the source server and this follow in the destination server: ssh user@localhost -p 8888

Find files of two different extensions and copy them to a directory

Copy 3 files from 3 different servers and adds server name tag to file copied

Get the Volume labels all bitlocker volumes had before being encrypted
Get information of volume labels of bitlocker volumes, even if they are encrypted and locked (no access to filesystem, no password provided). Note that the volume labels can have spaces, but only if you name then before encryption. Renaming a bitlocker partition after being encrypted does not have the same effect as doing it before.

Find the package that installed a command

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Open (in vim) all modified files in a git repository
For editing files added to the index: $ vim `git diff --name-only --cached` To edit all changed files: $ vim `git diff --name-only HEAD` To edit changed files matching glob: $ vim `git diff --name-only -- '*.html'` If the commands needs to support filenames with whitespace, it gets a bit hacky (see http://superuser.com/questions/336016/invoking-vi-through-find-xargs-breaks-my-terminal-why for the reason): $ git diff --name-only -z | xargs -0 bash -c '

Bulk install
Like 7172, but much easier.


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