Commands by volve (0)

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Compose 2 images to 1
Compose 2 images (foreground.jpg with background.jpg) into 1 (image.jpg), the numeric parameters stablish the size of the foreground.jpg image (96x96) and the position x,y (+250+70) relative to the background.jpg image. Images can be any format, jpg, png, bmp, etc...

SAR - List the average memory usage for all days recorded under '/var/log/sa/*' using sar -r.

Terminal - Show directories in the PATH, one per line with sed and bash3.X `here string'
another method : awk '{gsub(/:/, "\n");print}'

Simple XML tag extract with sed
Limited, but useful construct to extract text embedded in XML tags. This will only work if bar is all on one line. If nobody posts an alternative for the multiline sed version, I'll figure it out later...

Simulate typing

clear screen, keep prompt at eye-level (faster than clear(1), tput cl, etc.)
this leaves the cursor at the bottom of the terminal screen, where your eyes are. ctrl-l moves it to the top, forcing you to look up.

list files recursively by size

Connect to SMTP server using STARTTLS
Allows you to connect to an SMTP server over TLS, which is useful for debugging SMTP sessions. (Much like telnet to 25/tcp). Once connected you can manually issue SMTP commands in the clear (e.g. EHLO)

Search command history on bash
Very handy and time-saving. Do a 'ctrl+ r' on command prompt. You will see a "(reverse-i-search)`':" mark. Just type any sub-string of the command you want to search(provided you have used it sometime in the same session). Keep on searching by repeatedly pressing ctrl+r. Press enter once you get the desired command string.

dd with progress bar and statistics to gzipped image


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