Commands by vududevil (2)

  • Use set +o noclobber and you will be able to replace files again Show Sample Output


    7
    set -o noclobber
    vududevil · 2009-03-10 01:39:18 0
  • Add the functions to the .bashrc to make it work Example: First go to the iso file directory and type: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- user@box:~$ miso file.iso ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It will put you into a temporary mounting point directory (ISO_CD) and will show the files You can umount the iso file whatever the directory you are ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- user@box:~/ISO_CD$ uiso ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- It wil umount the iso file and remove the temporary directory in your home


    4
    function miso () { mkdir ~/ISO_CD && sudo mount -o loop "$@" ~/ISO_CD && cd ~/ISO_CD && ls; } function uiso () { cd ~ && sudo umount ~/ISO_CD && rm -r ~/ISO_CD; }
    vududevil · 2009-02-25 03:41:35 1

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