Commands by vuurst (1)

  • command was too long... this is the complete command: fname=$1; f=$( ls -la $fname ); if [ -n "$f" ]; then fsz=$( echo $f | awk '{ print $5 }' ); if [ "$fsz" -ne "0" ]; then nrrec=$( wc -l $fname | awk '{ print $1 }' ); recsz=$( expr $fsz / $nrrec ); echo "$recsz"; else echo "0"; fi else echo "file $fname does not exist" >&2; fi First the input is stored in var $fname The file is checked for existance using "ls -lart". If the output of "ls -lart" is empty, the error message is given on stderr Otherwise the filelength is taken from the output of "ls -lart" (5th field) With "wc -l" the number of records (or lines) is taken. The record size is filelength devided by the number of records. please note: this method does not take into account any headers, variable length records and only works on ascii files where the records are sperated by 0x0A (or 0x0A/0x0D on MS-DOS/Windows). Show Sample Output


    0
    fname=$1;f=$(ls -la $fname);fsz=$(echo $f|awk '{ print $5 }');nrrec=$(wc -l $fname|awk '{ print $1 }');recsz=$(expr $fsz / $nrrec);echo "$recsz"
    vuurst · 2010-09-14 08:40:22 0

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