Commands by w216 (3)

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Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

resume scp-filetransfer with rsync
resume a partial scp-filetransfer with rsync

Kill all processes that listen to ports begin with 50 (50, 50x, 50xxx,...)
Run netstat as root (via sudo) to get the ID of the process listening on the desired socket. Use awk to 1) match the entry that is the listening socket, 2) matching the exact port (bounded by leading colon and end of column), 3) remove the trailing slash and process name from the last column, and finally 4) use the system(…) command to call kill to terminate the process. Two direct commands, netstat & awk, and one forked call to kill. This does kill the specific port instead of any port that starts with 50. I consider this to be safer.

Find
A lot of X applications accept --geometry parameter so that you can set application size and position. But how can you figure out the exact arguments for --geometry? Launch an application, resize and reposition its window as needed, then launch xwininfo in a terminal an click on the application window. You will see some useful window info including its geometry.

SSH connection through host in the middle

Extract all of the files on an RPM on a non-RPM *nix

Network Folder Copy with Monitoring ( tar + nc + pv )
Transfer tar stream thru nc with pv montoiring taken from: http://www.catonmat.net/blog/unix-utilities-pipe-viewer/

Display standard information about device
Queries the specified ethernet device for associated driver information

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Get the ip registered to a domain on OpenWRT
I use this in a script on my openwrt router to check if my DynDNS needs to be updated, saves your account from being banned for blank updates.


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