Commands by walterl (1)

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List the files any process is using
List the files a process is using.

List your largest installed packages (on Debian/Ubuntu)

Restart Xen XAPI
Restarts the XAPI service on the host, mostly used by Xen Center. It does not affect any running VMs, just the Xen client tools that may be connected. On my list as XAPI frustratingly keeps running out of memory and getting killed off.

Identify name and resolution of all jpgs in current directory

Use result of the last command
\$ which python /usr/bin/python \$ ll `!!` lrwxrwxrwx 1 root root 9 2010-11-08 22:01 /usr/bin/python -> python2.6

quickly formats a fat partition. usefull for flash drives

Speed up builds and scripts, remove duplicate entries in $PATH. Users scripts are oftern bad: PATH=/apath:$PATH type of thing cause diplicate.
Thanks to the authors of: $ awk '!x[$0]++' and the author of: $ joinargs() { (local IFS="$1"; shift && echo "$*") } and others, we can have a fast Linux or android. IMPORTANT if you find a priority order problem in PATH you can push a path directory to the front without duplication as follows: $ PATH=/bin:$PATH then ... Check duplication with: $ echo $PATH|tr : '\n'|sort|uniq -d Finally do a very neat line by line list of $PATH: $ echo "${PATH//:/$'\n'} The speed up is very noticeable for android, and builds on Linux Ubantu are much faster with make and scripts. I will update the command on request. Timothy from SONY

Use lynx to run repeating website actions
This command will tell lynx to read keystrokes from the specified file - which can be used in a cronjob to auto-login on websites that give you points for logging in once a day *cough cough* (which is why I used -accept_all_cookies). For creating your keystroke file, use: $ lynx -cmd_log yourfile

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

find out how many days since given date
You can also do this for seconds, minutes, hours, etc... Can't use dates before the epoch, though.


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