Commands by warkruid (2)

  • The glob pattern * expands to all files, no need for the 'ls' command. The quotes around "$i" make sure filenames with spaces in them are handled correctly. mplayer determines if it is a media file and plays it, or gives errors and the loop asks if this file has to be removed. Show Sample Output


    -1
    for i in *; do mplayer "$i" && rm -i "$i"; done
    warkruid · 2013-12-26 17:13:23 0
  • I sometimes have use an usb stick to distribute files to several standalone "internet" pc's. I don't trust these machines period. The sticks I have do not have a write protection. So as a added security measure I fill the unused space on the (small) usb stick with a file with randomly generated bits. Any malware that tries to write to this stick will find no space on it. Tested on slackware 14 Note: you may need root access to write to the device. This depends on your mount options. Show Sample Output


    0
    set +e +u; dd if=/dev/urandom of="/media/usb1/$$";sync;sync
    warkruid · 2013-12-22 14:35:53 0

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