Commands by weirdan (1)

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File rotation without rename command
Rotates log files with "gz"-extension in a directory for 7 days and enumerates the number in file name. i.e.: logfile.1.gz > logfile.2.gz I needed this line due to the limitations on AIX Unix systems which do not ship with the rename command.

remove audio trac from a video file
create a copy of a video file without the audio tracs

Quick directory bookmarks
Set a bookmark as normal shell variable $ p=/cumbersome/path/to/project To go there $ to p This saves one "$" and is faster to type ;-) The variable is still useful as such: $ vim $p/ will expand the variable (at least in bash) and show a list of files to edit. If setting the bookmarks is too much typing you could add another function $ bm() { eval $1=$(pwd); } then bookmark the current directory with $ bm p

Piping Microphone Audio Over Netcat
Send microphone audio to another computer using netcat and arecord. Connect to the stream using "nc [other ip] 3333|aplay" You can set up two-way communication by piping audio the reverse direction on another port: Machine #1: $arecord -D hw:0,0 -f S16_LE -c2|nc -l 3333 &;nc -l 3334|aplay Machine #2: $$ip=[machine1_ip];arecord -D hw:0,0 -f S16_LE -c2|nc $ip 3334 &;nc $ip 3333|aplay

check open ports without netstat or lsof

Find usb device
I often use it to find recently added ou removed device, or using find in /dev, or anything similar. Just run the command, plug the device, and wait to see him and only him

search for text in files. recursive.
recursively search dir for a a particular file type, search each file for a particular text.

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

prints the parameter you used on the previous command

Convert unix timestamp to date
The "-d" option for gnu's "date" command can calculate positive or negative offset from any time, including "now". You can even specify a source timezone (the output timezone can be set with the TZ environment variable). Useful! Fun! Not very well documented!


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