Commands by wickedcpj (2)

  • another formatting/oneliner for lsof User - Process - Port Show Sample Output


    3
    alias oports="echo 'User: Command: Port:'; echo '----------------------------' ; lsof -i 4 -P -n | grep -i 'listen' | awk '{print \$3, \$1, \$9}' | sed 's/ [a-z0-9\.\*]*:/ /' | sort -k 3 -n |xargs printf '%-10s %-10s %-10s\n' | uniq"
    wickedcpj · 2011-08-02 04:54:25 0
  • Gives you an updating woot! item tracker! Show Sample Output


    -6
    telnet zerocarbs.wooters.us
    wickedcpj · 2010-06-26 05:50:48 0

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