Commands by winemore (1)

  • Just replace 15m with desired time. no suffix or 's' for seconds; 'h' for hours You need to be root or in audio group to write to /dev/dsp. You may use yes | head -n 2000 for about 1 second beep. Wrote this as echo -e '\a' not always works as desired (ex. visual bell)


    0
    sleep 15m; yes > /dev/dsp
    winemore · 2011-04-17 15:19:14 8

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