Commands by workingsmart (1)

  • Next time you are leaching off of someone else's wifi use this command before you start your bittorrent ...for legitimate files only of course. It creates a hexidecimal string using md5sum from the first few lines of /dev/urandom and splices it into the proper MAC address format. Then it changes your MAC and resets your wireless (wlan0:0). Show Sample Output


    7
    ran=$(head /dev/urandom | md5sum); MAC=00:07:${ran:0:2}:${ran:3:2}:${ran:5:2}:${ran:7:2}; sudo ifconfig wlan0 down hw ether $MAC; sudo ifconfig wlan0 up; echo ifconfig wlan0:0
    workingsmart · 2009-07-16 16:21:44 2

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