Commands by yellowspaced (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Ping scanning without nmap
Usefull for when you don't have nmap and need to find a missing host. Pings all addresses from 10.1.1.1 to 10.1.1.254, modify for your subnet. Timeout set to 1 sec for speed, if running over a slow connection you should raise that to avoid missing replies. This will clean up the junk, leaving just the IP address: for i in {1..254}; do ping -c 1 -W 1 10.1.1.$i | grep 'from' | cut -d' ' -f 4 | tr -d ':'; done

Localize provenance of current established connections
Sample command to obtain a list of geographic localization for established connections, extracted from netstat. Need geoiplookup command ( part of geoip package under CentOS)

Console clock
Turn your terminal into digital clock.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Retry the previous command until it exits successfully
Executes the previously-run command constantly until it returns 0 (success). Put a

bash function to check for something every 5 seconds
checkfor: have the shell check anything you're waiting for. 'while : ; do' is an infinite loop '$*' executes the command passed in 'sleep 5' - change for your tastes, sleep for 5 seconds bash, ksh, likely sh, maybe zsh Ctrl-c to break the loop

stream a youtube video with mpv where $1 is the youtube link.
opens a new session with video stream

Kill most recently created process.
Kills the most recently created firefox process.

Get your current Public IP

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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