Commands by ynedelchev (4)

  • If you want to create fast a very big file for testing purposes and you do not care about its content, then you can use this command to create a file of arbitrary size within less than a second. Content of file will be all zero bytes. The trick is that the content is just not written to the disk, instead the space for it is somehow reserved on operating system level and file system level. It would be filled when first accessed/written (not sure about the mechanism that lies below, but it makes the file creation super fast). Instead of '1G' as in the example, you could use other modifiers like 200K for kilobytes (1024 bytes), 500M for megabytes (1024 * 1024 bytes), 20G for Gigabytes (1024*1024*1024 bytes), 30T for Terabytes (1024^4 bytes). Also P for Penta, etc... Command tested under Linux. Show Sample Output


    3
    truncate --size 1G bigfile.txt
    ynedelchev · 2015-02-26 11:56:27 0
  • If you have a client that connects to a server via plain text protocol such as HTTP or FTP, with this command you can monitor the messages that the client sends to the server. Application level text stream will be dumped on the command line as well as saved in a file called proxy.txt. You have to change 8080 to the local port where you want your client to connect to. Change also 192.168.0.1 to the IP address of the destination server and 80 to the port of the destination server. Then simply point your client to localhost 8080 (or whatever you changed it to). The traffic will be redirected to host 192.168.0.1 on port 80 (or whatever you changed them to). Any requests from the client to the server will be dumped on the console as well as in the file "proxy.txt". Unfortunately the responses from the server will not be dumped. Show Sample Output


    6
    mkfifo fifo; while true ; do echo "Waiting for new event"; nc -l 8080 < fifo | tee -a proxy.txt /dev/stderr | nc 192.168.0.1 80 > fifo ; done
    ynedelchev · 2015-01-14 09:26:54 2
  • This command will execute 1000 requests to the http URL http://127.0.0.1:8000 handlink 100 concurent connections at a time. Then it will display statistics about the time that have been taken. Show Sample Output


    2
    ab -n 1000 -c 100 http://127.0.0.1:8000/
    ynedelchev · 2014-02-18 09:32:01 0
  • This command will traverse all of the folders and subfolders under current working directory. For every file inside it, it will do a search inside the content of the file for a specific term 'what'. Then it will print a list of the lines that contain that term (and match that pattern). Each matching line will be preceded with the path and name to the file and then the line number iside taht file wehre the pattern was found. Then the actual content of the matching lien will be printed. The output will be piped throug less, so that the user can scroll through it if it goes beyond the limits of the current display window. Show Sample Output


    1
    find . -exec grep -Hn what \{\} \; | less
    ynedelchev · 2014-02-17 09:59:01 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Temporarily ignore known SSH hosts
you may create an alias also, which I did ;-) alias sshu="ssh -o UserKnownHostsFile=/dev/null "

Outgoing IP of server
Faster than the curl/wget-approaches.

Create and replay macros in vim
You can record, then replay a series of keystrokes in vim. In command mode 'q', then a letter [a-zA-Z] starts macro recording mode. Enter a series of vim commands. When done, enter command mode again, and press 'q' to stop recording. To replay, enter command mode, then press @{letter}

Lists all files and directories with modified time newer than a given date
This is great for looking for files that have been updated recently. Logs especially or monitoring what files were added during an install.

Generate diff of first 500 lines of two files
Useful for massive files where doing a full diff would take too long. This just runs diff on the first 500 lines of each. The use of subshells to feed STDIN is quite a useful construct.

Show sorted list of files with sizes more than 1MB in the current dir

draw honeycomb
Fill the entire terminal screen. Is COLUMNS or LINES are undefined run "resize"

nmap IP block and autogenerate comprehensive Nagios service checks
More info here: http://nagioswiki.com/wiki/index.php/Autocreating_Nagios_Configuration_with_Nmap_and_Nmap2Nagios.pl

Dump the root directory to an external hard drive
This will compress the root directory to an external hard drive and split it to parts once it reaches the 4 Gigs file system limit. You can simply restore it with: $ restore ivf /media/My\ Passport/Fedora10bckup/root_dump_fedora

Create an easy to pronounce shortened URL from CLI
Shorter regex.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: